All entries for Kilronan (Glenahiry)



Kilronan (Glenahiry)

More information on Samuel Lewis' Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1837)
Accompanying Lewis map for Waterford

FOUR-MILE-WATER

FOUR-MILE-WATER, a village, in the parish of KILRONAN, barony of GLANAHEIRY, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Clonmel, on the river Suir, over which is a good stone bridge: the population is returned with the parish. It has a constabulary police station, a neat and commodious R. C. chapel, and some remains of a castle.

KILRONAN

KILRONAN, a parish, in the barony of GLENAHIRY, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 4 miles (S. W.) from Clonmel, on the new road to Dungarvan ; containing 3843 inhabitants. It comprises 15,390 statute acres, including a considerable quantity of mountain land, much of which, however, is planted or under cultivation. Limestone is found in several places. Some of the scenery is extremely rich and varied, particularly where the river Suir, which forms the northern and western boundaries of the parish, separates Kilmanahan Castle, the seat of Lieut.-Col. Nuttall Greene, from Knocklofty, in the county of Tipperary, the seat of the Earl of Donoughmore. There are constabulary police stations at Kilmanahan-bridge and Four-Mile-Water : and fairs are held at Windygap on June 21st and Aug. 21st. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Lismore, and in the patronage of the Duke of Devonshire, in whom the rectory is impropriate : the tithes amount to #387. 13. 4., of which #221. 10. 4. is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar. There is no church, glebe-house, or glebe. In the R. C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Newcastle, or Four-Mile-Water, at which latter place is a neat chapel. There is a public school of about 70 children, to which Lady Osborne contributes #5 annually. also three private schools, in which about 280 children are educated. Here are some remains of the church and of the fort of Castlereagh ; also of Castle Conagh, a square building, occupying the summit of a limestone rock on the bank of the river Neir.


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