All Lewis entries for Ballylaneen



Ballylaneen

More information on Samuel Lewis' Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1837)
Accompanying Lewis map for Waterford

BALLYLANEEN

BALLYLANEEN, a parish, in the barony of UPPER-THIRD, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 3 miles (s.) from Kilmacthomas; containing 3575 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the river Mahon and on St. George's channel, and comprises 6194 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. Carrig Castle, the residence of H. Power, Esq., and Seafield, of P. Barron, Esq., both pleasantly situated, are within its limits. It is a vicarage, in the diocese of Lismore, and is part of the union of Stradbally; the rectory is impropriate in the Duke of Devonshire. The tithes amount to £378. 10., of which £78. 10. is payable to the impropriator, and £300 to the vicar. In the R. C. divisions also it forms part of the union or district of Stradbally, and contains a chapel. There are five pay schools, in which are about 270 boys and 97 girls. There are some considerable remains of Ballynaclash castle, situated on an eminence ; and at Temple-Brie is a vast insulated rock, about 40 yards from the shore, on which are traces of an ancient building supposed to have been the residence of O'Bric, chief of the southern Decies. A species of hawk, remarkable for great strength and courage, formerly frequented this rock, and is still occasionally seen.

BONMAHON

BONMAHON, a maritime village, in the parish of BALLYLANEEN, barony of UPPERTHIRD, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 3 miles (S.) from Kilmacthomas; containing 972 inhabitants. This place is situated on the coast of St. George's channel, and derives its name from the river Mahon, which rises in the Cummeragh mountains, and here falls into the sea. It is much frequented as a watering-place during the summer, and contains several neat private residences and convenient lodging-houses for the accommodation of visiters ; and in the immediate vicinity are numerous houses built for persons employed in the mines. The beach is well adapted for bathing, and the village might be made a place of fashionable resort; but the land being principally the property of the College of Physicians, who cannot grant leases for more than 31 years, very little improvement has been made. The surrounding scenery is very pleasing, and a wooden bridge over the Mahon adds much to its picturesque character. A new church, with a school-house adjoining, has been recently erected on the eastern side of the river, in the parish of Kilbarrymeadan; the school is supported by Lady Osborne. The valuable mines of this place and in the neighbourhood produce copper and lead, with a portion of silver; they have been worked from an early period, and veins have been opened in several parts and worked to a considerable extent. In 1745 a Company rented these mines from Lord Ranelagh for a term of 31 years, under an agreement to give to his lordship one-eighth part of all the ore obtained; and the works were carried on with spirit for eight or ten years. They were subsequently worked by Mr. Wyse, who employed 300 men; and, in 1811, the Earl of Ormonde renewed the enterprise with every prospect of success, but, after a very large expenditure, was induced to desist; they are at present under the management of the Irish Mining Company. The veins are found in some parts of the rock within a few feet of the surface, and none have been worked to a greater depth than 25 yards. Copper ore is observed in many places along the beach. The principal mines are on the property of the Marquess of Ormonde, on the lands belonging to the see of Waterford, and on those of Lady Osborne and J. Power O'Shee, Esq.-See BALLYLANEEN.

KILMACTHOMAS

KILMACTHOMAS, a post-town, partly in the parish of BALLYLANEEN, hut chiefly in that of ROSSMIRE, barony of UPPERTHIRD, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 12 miles (W. S. W.) from Waterford, and 873/4 (S. W.) from Dublin, on the road from Cork to Waterford ; containing 982 inhabitants. It is situated on a steep hill, at the foot of which flows the small river Mahon, over which there is a good stone bridge. It has a dispensary, and is the headquarters of the constabulary police for the county: petty sessions are held here or at Stradbally on alternate Tuesdays. Fairs are held on Feb. 2nd, March 17th, May 12th, Aug. 12th, Sept. 29th, and Dec. 6th and 21st. A castle existed at this place, which was taken by Sir Charles Vavasour in 1643 ; it belonged to the Poer family, who are still the chief owners of property in this neighbourhood.


Irish Times subscribers | | John Grenham | | Sitemap | | Login | | Subscribe | | Contact | | FAQs | | What's new?| | Privacy policy

Copyright © John Grenham 2020